October152014

ribcaqe:

this is the only Columbus Day post you should reblog

(Source: twoheadedshark, via undereyelouisvuittons)

October142014

thebigblackwolfe:

shavostars:

I think about pokemon in non-battle situations a lot. Like pokemon who have been trained/raised to be helpers and assistants than to be battle partners.

Pokemon visiting hospitals to cheer patients up like dogs and cats do. Or ones that help kids learn to read, speak, swim, go through therapy?! Even pokemon who’s abilities help owners with specific disabilities?!

I love thinking of pokemon outside of battle situations.

Service Pokemon!

SERVICE POKEMON!!!!

(via elphabaforpresidentofgallifrey)

3PM
generally:

im fuckin dying 

generally:

im fuckin dying 

(via agoldenwhale)

3PM
selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.
It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.
Things you can do:
        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.
           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.
      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.
     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.
       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.
       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.

It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.

Things you can do:

        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.

           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.

      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.

     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.

       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.

       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

(via abuseaid)

2PM

pixyled:

if this isnt the EXACT plot of the movie i will be MAD

(Source: bryko, via sarahnesthetic)

9AM

spoooky-couch:

whenever i’m leaving a conversation i say “bi” to remind and tell people i am bisexual. for some reason this has not been working very well and most people think i’m straight despite my reminders. however, they do sometimes praise me and say “good bi” in response.

(via kaeandlucy)

October132014

Anonymous said: Do you recommend talking to your teachers, profs, whatever, about PTSD or other similar issues if you have them

It honestly depends entirely on your comfort level and what you feel is best. I WILL say though that I decided not to talk to my professors about it at the beginning of this year, because I wanted so desperately to be normal and not have to go through awkward conversations like that. And eventually my professor, who does a lot of casual physical contact, put his hand on my shoulder when I wasn’t expecting it and I screamed in the middle of class and freaked out. I think for me and where I am right now it’s definitely the right decision, but I can only speak for myself. Whatever you decide, it’s your story so it’s 100% your choice whether you discuss it and what you discuss when you do :)

8PM

Tip for anyone with PTSD related hyper vigilance or ADD (or in my case, both!) Finding a way to actively engage with your notes during lectures really helps make sure you don’t space out. I take all of mine in French, but if you don’t know another language then try color coding them with a different color pen for every line, or adding illustrations, or writing commentary in the margins

October112014
2PM
abuseaid:

[Image Description: Art of sweetheart candy with the words “No does not mean convince me”]

abuseaid:

[Image Description: Art of sweetheart candy with the words “No does not mean convince me”]

(Source: sugarbone)

9AM

modestdemidov:

"make up is false advertisement!"

translation:

"i view women as products"

(via lynniethebeegirl)

9AM
9AM

bogleech:

As C.M. Kosemen explains throughout All Yesterdays, we really can’t ever know how much fat and other soft tissues contributed to the overall shape of dinosaurs since that’s the first thing to rot and shrivel tight against their bones and like even a sperm whale has a little skinny skeleton.

so like

image

image

how would we know?

(via theamazingindi)

9AM

awfulbunny:

Solidarity with survivors of multiple traumas. 

Solidarity with unstable survivors. 

Solidarity with survivors of multiple kinds of abuse, over long periods of time. 

Solidarity with survivors with complex narratives. 

Solidarity with quiet survivors. 

Solidarity with survivors who can’t find their voice, survivors who can’t express themselves well or at all or in the ways that make other comfortable. 

Solidarity with ‘bad’ survivors, survivors who can’t set an example.

(via cucumb-ler)

9AM
“They say that “Confronting triggers, not avoiding them, is the best way to overcome PTSD”. They point out that “exposure therapy” is the best treatment for trauma survivors, including rape victims. And that this involves reliving the trauma and exposing yourself to traumatic stimuli, exactly what trigger warnings are intended to prevent. All this is true. But I feel like they are missing a very important point.

YOU DO NOT GIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY TO PEOPLE WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT.

Psychotherapists treat arachnophobia with exposure therapy, too. They expose people first to cute, little spiders behind a glass cage. Then bigger spiders. Then they take them out of the cage. Finally, in a carefully controlled environment with their very supportive therapist standing by, they make people experience their worst fear, like having a big tarantula crawl all over them. It usually works pretty well.

Finding an arachnophobic person, and throwing a bucket full of tarantulas at them while shouting “I’M HELPING! I’M HELPING!” works less well.

And this seems to be the arachnophobe’s equivalent of the PTSD “advice” in the Pacific Standard. There are two problems with its approach. The first is that it avoids the carefully controlled, anxiety-minimizing setup of psychotherapy.

The second is that YOU DO NOT GIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY TO PEOPLE WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT.” The Wonderful Thing About Triggers | Slate Star Codex (via brutereason)

(via abuseaid)

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